Posts Tagged ‘Food’

Calling all you foodies – ChefDB

Friday, November 20th, 2009

The film industry has IMDB. Now the food industry has ChefDB. What a brilliant idea. It’s a database of restaurants, who works in them, where they’ve worked and related links.

Genius.

Now, you can track your favorite chefs. See when ratings started going up or down.. and why. You can see where else these same people have worked in the past, to find other restaurants that you might want to go to as well. Or where they are headed to in the future, so you can bookmark that as a place you want to try out.

Pure Genius.

http://www.chefdb.com/

I *heart* bacon

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009

Found this series of pics going through Gizmodo and Geekologie and I had to share.

Bacon Sunrise

Bacon Sunrise

Bacon Road

Bacon Road

Chicken wing update

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

I tried last night at a Bar called B.F.D. in Singapore… and realized that this is a much more difficult problem in Asia than in the US. You see, in Asia, Chicken wings are served whole. When you order a chicken wing here, usually it comes with the Drumette, Wing and tip all attached. So, to separate the bones, you need to break down more connective tissue and if the wing is already cooked throughly, the meat just comes apart.

I’ll need to investigate this matter more thoroughly by visiting Hooters in Clarke Quay. 😉

How to eat a chicken wing

Monday, November 16th, 2009

I just found this post through Digg. I’ve been eating chicken wings wrong my whole life. I need to rush out TODAY and try this technique out.

http://www.bitrebels.com/geek/how-to-correctly-eat-a-chicken-wing/

Durians + Booze = Fail

Friday, September 18th, 2009

I can’t believe this is true. I’ve heard this myth a ton of times and always thought it to be a old wive’s tale. Who knew.

NewScientist

The most incredible grapes

Sunday, July 26th, 2009

These are the both the most expensive and the best grapes I’ve ever had.

Kyoho grapes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyoho_grape

They are best known in Japan. But Taiwan and Korea have them as well. If you look at the packaging in the picture below, the price is correct. S$85 for a small box of them. That’s nearly $60 USD. So about 1-2 dollars A GRAPE!!

The best way to describe them is to describe them in terms of candy they sell in the US. Imagine the flavor of Japanese chewing gum crossed with the texture of gummy bears.

They have a very thick skin and have a seed or two each. But they are worth every dollar. You can pick up some of the cheaper varieties for about 1/4 the price. But, the difference is astounding.

RED MANGO IS HERE!

Friday, June 19th, 2009

My goal of transplanting all the things I miss from the US to Singapore got a step closer today. I was reading around the local food blogs and came across this little jem.

Camemberu

Basically, RED MANGO IS HERE!!! It’s been here the whole time I’ve been in Singapore almost. But its tucked away in a corner of one of the millions of malls in this city. I’m going to have to make a trip there this weekend and see if it’s the same as in the US.

#01-140G, Tasty Treatz
Suntec City Mall
3 Temasek Boulevard
Singapore
Open 10am to 10pm

Kogi

Thursday, February 12th, 2009

I just came across this new food craze in Los Angeles, Kogi. Can someone try it out and let me know if it’s all it’s reported to be?

It’s a Korean/Mexican fusion Taco Truck. It roves around the Los Angeles region to serve up their signature foods.

I hear waits can go up to hours at a time for their bulgogi tacos and other treats. Thank goodness they keep people upto date with their web 2.0 goodness. They twitter their locations and post lots of updates on their website.

http://www.kogibbq.com

Check it.

Macau

Saturday, November 8th, 2008

Like how Hong Kong and Singapore were colonized by the British and Vietnam by the French, Macau was colonized by the Portugese. Two of the many things they inherited was food and architecture.

I’ve not been to Portugal. But, my portugese co workers tell me these photos could have been taken there (minus the Chinese signage). It’s a weird feeling walking around old European architecture with a thousand Chinese people. I kinda feel like i’m in either Dineyland or vegas. Which is fitting, since Macau has been referred to as the Vegas of Asia.

As for food. Wow.

I didn’t get to try too much food while I was there. But, I did get to try some eggggcelent egg tarts. These belong to a bakery that a few locals swear by. It’s a bit out of the way, but well worth the visit. The crust was warm and flaky like a nice croissant or baklava. (I know I’m missspelling it, apologies) and the filling was a delicious warm custard with just a touch of sweetness to counter the savoryness of the egg flavor.

Fantastic.

I’m a travelling man.

Thursday, October 16th, 2008

As you undoubtedly have noticed, I’m posting blog posts again. That means that I’ve finished my last project. That also means that I’ll start travelling again.

As I write this post, I’m travelling down a freeway in Hanoi, Vietnam. I’ll be spending a long weekend here going to Haolong Bay with some friends from the US: Bobby, Richard and Cindy.

Next weekend I’ll be in Hong Kong. I’ll be there to do some shopping and to take in the sights. I’ll follow that up with a road trip in Thailand, a beach excursion in Bali, a mountain trek in Sapa and a visit back home to see my family during the Christmas holidays.

It’s hard work in Singapore. But, it’s these few months of rest and relaxation that follow that make it all worth it.

Here’s a pic of my dinner tonight. It’s called Banh Cuon. Which translates to wrapped cake. I got it from a street vendor for .85c.